Smile Wide Dental

Frequently Asked Questions

Why Smile Wide?

We have multiple convenient locations and we pride ourselves in providing attentive, compassionate and personalized care you deserve. At Smile Wide, your smile is in good hands. Treatment is provided by a caring and professional team of doctors who believe in using the latest technology and techniques. We take seriously the trust you place in us.

When should my child first see a dentist?

“First visit by first birthday” sums it up. The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend a child’s first dental exam at the age of one. Your child should visit a pediatric dentist when the first tooth comes in, usually between 6 and 12 months of age. This visit will establish a dental home for your child. Early examination and preventative care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future.

Why should my baby see a dentist so early?

The most important reason is to begin a thorough prevention program. Dental problems can begin early. A big concern is early childhood tooth decay. Once a child’s diet includes anything besides breast-milk, erupted teeth are at risk for decay. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental problems. Children with healthy teeth chew food easily and smile with confidence. Start your child now on a lifetime of good dental habits.

When should I start cleaning my baby’s teeth?

The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. As soon as the teeth begin to appear, start brushing twice daily using fluoridated toothpaste and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Use a “smear” of toothpaste to brush the teeth of a child less than 2 years of age. For the 2-5 year old, dispense a “pea-size” amount of toothpaste and perform or assist your child’s tooth brushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.

What is Orthodontics?

Orthodontics (from Greek orthos “straight or proper”; and odons “tooth”) is the specialty of dentistry that is concerned with the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of malocclusions (improper bites), which may be a result of tooth irregularity, disproportionate jaw relationships, or both.

What is an Orthodontist?

An orthodontist is a dentist with an additional 2-3 years of full-time post-Doctoral studying to specialize in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. The practice of orthodontics requires professional skill in the design, application and control of corrective appliances to bring teeth, lips and jaws into proper alignment and to achieve facial balance/harmony. All orthodontists are dentists, however, not all dentists are orthodontists.

Should I see a general dentist while I have braces?

Yes. You should continue to see your general dentist every six months for cleanings and dental checkups.

How do you know if a person needs orthodontic treatment?

It is often difficult to know if treatment is necessary because there are many problems that can occur even though the front teeth look straight. The best way to find out if you have orthodontic problems is to visit an orthodontist. Since our initial exam is complimentary, it only makes sense to schedule a consultation with us and we will be happy to give recommendations.

Am I a candidate for orthodontic treatment?

Orthodontics is not merely for improving the aesthetics of the smile; orthodontic treatment improves bad bites (malocclusions). Malocclusions occur as a result of tooth or jaw misalignment. Malocclusions affect the way you smile, chew, clean your teeth or feel about your smile.

What are the signs or symptoms of orthodontic problems? 

Although determining treatment needs is difficult for you to assess, the following may help in prompting you to seek our orthodontists' advice.

Look at the teeth at any age. If you see any signs of crooked teeth, gaps between your child’s teeth or overlapping teeth, orthodontic treatment is needed.

Bite all the way down, but keep your lips open so you see can the teeth. Do the front top teeth line up with the bottom? Do the top teeth protrude out away from the bottom teeth? Do the top front teeth cover more than 50% of the bottom teeth? Are the top teeth behind the bottom teeth? All these are indicators for potential orthodontic treatment.

Look at the alignment of the jaws. Does the jaw shift off center during biting down? If you see any misalignment or shifting of the jaw, it suggests a skeletal or jaw bone problem, which requires early orthodontic intervention.

These are only some of the obvious symptoms of orthodontic problems.

What are some signs that braces may be needed?

Why should malocclusions be treated?

According to studies by the American Association of Orthodontists, untreated malocclusions can result in a variety of problems:

Ultimately, orthodontics does more than make a pretty smile—it creates a healthier you.

At what age should an orthodontist see my child? Do all baby teeth have to fall before initiating orthodontic treatment?

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that your child be evaluated by age seven. Hence all baby teeth need not be gone before initiating orthodontic treatment. In fact, early detection of some orthodontic problems is important in order to take early preventive/interceptive action and avoid more difficult treatment later. Early treatment also potentially prevents extraction of teeth which is needed in some cases if the teeth get very